Posts Tagged ‘Sailing’

A small dinghy repair so a client’s children can go sailing over the May Day holiday weekend

April 29, 2017

A small sailing dinghy brought in for a small wooden trim repair

the quarter knees and the transom trim fixings had failed due to old age

 

 

 

Clamping back into position and using a heavier grade of fixings and a better method of fixings so the problem does not happen again

 

All finished and ready to retuen to a happy client so he can go sailing over the bank holiday weekend

 

Fitting the port side top plank

February 7, 2016

Just giving the top plank a coat of thinned varnish before fitting to the dinghy

Starting to fix in position

The apprentice starting to nail plank in place

Using peg clamps and wedges to fit plank in position

The apprentice about half way down the port side

Finally fitted and with a second coat of thinned varnish to finish it off for the day

Redesigning the forehatch

January 24, 2016

The old forehatch was getting a bit passed its useful life and was in need of renewing and it was no longer fit for purpose. So it was removed which took some work as it was well fixed to the deck. However, it did in the end part with the deck.

The four pieces of the lower part of the forehatch were temporary fixed together to make up the shape which is going to be used as a jig to build the new forehatch so that the inside measurement can be used again, although the outside measurements are going to be different as the forehatch upstands are going to be thicker than before, so a lip can be made up to stop the water from coming through the joint in the hatch when it is closed.

The design of the upstands for the forehatch so that the water can not pass through the joint when the forehatch is closed while at sea in rough weather and water coming over the fore deck.

A good way to end the working year on a high note having done most of the jobs needed done before Christmas

December 21, 2015

Sasha the mascot surfacing to inspect the work since he last was on the yacht earlier in the year.

He seen a lot of differences to the yacht and it is feeling more homely now that many of the bits of the equipment is now back in place

One of the last major jobs to do in the New Year the cockpit getting the new seats in place and getting the Samson posts in the back corners and the finally get the manual bilge pipe run sorted and connected up to the skin fitting.

The bunk all cleared to sort out the trims to go back on now the major work in the cabin as been finished

It’s good to get to this stage and the long cold and wet days now a distant memory

Setting out the local area chart to plan our first trial sail once the final jobs are done on the yacht in the New Year.

Varnishing and other jobs getting done with the weather against us

November 19, 2015

Finished varnish work put in to storage for the winter so that the varnish can get a chance to harden off over the winter before getting their final coats in the spring when they are refitted to their various boats.

More varnishing to bits that are going to get refitted to various boats next spring

Two new storage items for equipment for a client’s yacht so that it will make it easier to use the equipment at sea

New oak cleats made from a pattern of an old cleat that a client had on his yacht and that he needed replacement cleats made from to match the ones on the yacht.

The first of five cut out of seasoned oak

Five new oak cleat blanks cut and now ready to shape to size.

Just the foredeck to go on after the bulkhead is glassed in place.

July 19, 2014

The work on the Enterprise is coming along well with just the front bulkhead to get glassed in place and then the fore deck can get glued down. Then the long job of trimming the edges of the deck up to do. Once this is done the equally long job of varnishing and paint the boat will start. Then finally the fitting can go back on and the boat will then be ready to go back float and I can go for a good long sail.

The history of Gadfly II/Mai-Star II

December 7, 2013

When you buy any old boat, it is good to try and find out about its history as well as you can. Seeing where it as been and the people who have owned over the years and find out about any stories you can learn from its past owners.

 

Gadfly II was the second of three boats to have the name of Gadfly and was  built by Anderson Rigden & Perkins in Whitstable. Its first owner was a man called Mr H.C.Doughty from Margate in Kent who had it launched in the spring of 1946. although the boat was starting to be built in 1939. From talking to people about the boat it was almost finished before the second world war started, but was put to one side and covered up for the rest of the second world war and finished off and launched in the spring of 1946.

 

This is where Mr Doughty comes into the picture having already owned Gadfly I otherwise called Gadfly Jack, This he sold her after the war and the one who had Gadfly II finished and launched and owned until the October of 1953 when Lt CDR Bawtree buy her and then sold it to Mr R.M.Parker in July 1955. Then it changed owners again in May 1959 when Mr W.D.Austin bought her.

 

Her next owner Mrs J.L.Watson bought her in July 1961 to sail her round the Solent with family, I was contacted by her son Charles Watson and he said that the boat was a good sailing boat for its size and the only reason his mother sold Gadfly II was because the family had increase in size and the boat was too small for them all to go on.

 

The next owner Mr R.J.Watts who owned for sailed her out of Erith Yacht Club but sold her again as he had plans to sail other boats and sold it to Mr E.J.Little who owned it from Dec 1962 to Dec 1968, when Mr F.G.Menden  owned it until May 1973 to Mr N.P.Knight from 10th May 1973. It is at this point the trial runs cold, apart from Mr Watts seeing Gadfly II off Pin Mill in Suffolk on the River Orwell and talking to its owner who now called Gadfly II just the The Fly that was in the early 1980’s.

 

It was the last time that have been able to find out where it was and who owned for until I came upon an advert on EBay. That she was a boat in need of a full restoration and was going for a small amount of money. The last owner had started to do some work, but he had not been able to carry on with her restoration and so I bought her and started the long and pain taking job of bring her back to life. This project started in 2008.

 

The first job was to strip her down to her basic shell and remove all the old paint and varnish off the hull and cabin sides and remove what was left of the decks. Once that was done then start the job of rebuilding the Gadfly II into a sailing yacht once more and get her sailing again.

 

The rest of the restoration project can be seen on the other posts on the long journey to restore Gadfly II.

The main hurdle in refitting an old classic yacht is sorting how it was put together in the first place.

November 10, 2013

When refitting or restorating old classic yachts the main hurdle is getting into the mindset of the person or people who build your classic yacht in the first place. Especially the tools and methods they employed to construct it.

With Mai-Star II or as she was called when she was first launched in 1946 Gadfly II, having been started to be built in 1939. Then she was put to one side during the hostiles and once work on boat got back into full swing she was finished off.

Trying to trace her history has been a bit of a minefield as many of the records from the boatyard where she was build have either been lost or destoryed at a fire at the boatyard or burned when the boatyard was closed. Either way I have been able to patch much of it from fromer owners or boatyard staff that are still a live today.

This winter the second major refit is taking place with the removing of a large number of ribs on the port side from midships to the transom and a few from the starboard side in the cockpit where a number of them were doubled or even had three ribs set side by side.

Babergh-20130806-00202

IMG-20130814-00218

Also there are a couple of planks that need replacing as these are damaged.

Mai-Star II replanking the hull

November 9, 2013

Now the log is here I can get on with the planking and get her watertight and now the ribs can get put in too.

J-Star Boat Services

now that the log has been delivered and there is a few dry days the mai- star II can get her new planking marked out of the log and can start to get her planking back in place.

View original post

The history of GadflyII

August 18, 2013

When you buy any old boat, it is good to try and find out about its history as well as you can. Seeing where it as been and the people who have owned over the years and find out about any stories you can learn from its past owners.

Gadfly II was the second of three boats to have the name of Gadfly and was built by Anderson Rigden & Perkins in Whitstable. Its first owner was a man called Mr H.C.Doughty from Margate in Kent who had it launched in the spring of 1946. although the boat was starting to be built in 1939. From talking to people about the boat it was almost finished before the second world war started, but was put to one side and covered up for the rest of the second world war and finished off and launched in the spring of 1946.

This is where Mr Doughty comes into the picture having already owned Gadfly I otherwise called Gadfly Jack, This he sold her after the war and the one who had Gadfly II finished and launched and owned until the October of 1953 when Lt CDR Bawtree buy her and then sold it to Mr R.M.Parker in July 1955. Then it changed owners again in May 1959 when Mr W.D.Austin bought her.

Her next owner Mrs J.L.Watson bought her in July 1961 to sail her round the Solent with family, I was contacted by her son Charles Watson and he said that the boat was a good sailing boat for its size and the only reason his mother sold Gadfly II was because the family had increase in size and the boat was too small for them all to go on.

The next owner Mr R.J.Watts who owned for sailed her out of Erith Yacht Club but sold her again as he had plans to sail other boats and sold it to Mr E.J.Little who owned it from Dec 1962 to Dec 1968, when Mr F.G.Menden owned it until May 1973 to Mr N.P.Knight from 10th May 1973. It is at this point the trial runs cold, apart from Mr Watts seeing Gadfly II off Pin Mill in Suffolk on the River Orwell and talking to its owner who now called Gadfly II just the The Fly that was in the early 1980’s.

It was the last time that have been able to find out where it was and who owned for until I came upon an advert on EBay. That she was a boat in need of a full restoration and was going for a small amount of money. The last owner had started to do some work, but he had not been able to carry on with her restoration and so I bought her and started the long and pain taking job of bring her back to life. This project started in 2007.

The first job was to strip her down to her basic shell and remove all the old paint and varnish off the hull and cabin sides and remove what was left of the decks. Once that was done then start the job of rebuilding the Gadfly II into a sailing yacht once more and get her sailing again.

The rest of the restoration project can be seen on the other posts on the long journey to restore Gadfly II.
If there is anyone who can help fill in the years between 1973 and 2007 could please email me at jstarboatservices1@gmail.com